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WHEN IS MY BABY DUE?

An estimated due date (EDD) can be influenced by your cycle, when you ovulated and when you conceived. A normal pregnancy is considered to be between 37-42 weeks.

According to Naegele’s rule, to find your EDD add 1 week and 9 months to the first day of your last menstrual period (LMP).

For example – if the first day of your (LMP) was the 7 Jan, your (EDD) would be 14 Nov.  If you choose to have a scan your (EDD) may vary slightly.  This is  not a concern, especially if the scan was not done in the early weeks. If your scan varies greatly you should discuss this with your caregiver.

HOW DO I FIND A CAREGIVER?

Most people have recommendations from their friends or family. Talk with them to see if they suit your personality and birth place. Everyone has a different need and reason for their choice of caregiver.

You can choose a midwife, obstetrician or (G.P if they attend births). www.findyourmidwife.co.nz lists all the midwives who belong to the New Zealand College of Midwives. You can search for midwives in your area, read information about them and check their availability.

WHERE SHOULD I HAVE MY BABY?

This is a personal choice for you, to be discussed with anyone supporting you at your birth. The options may also depend upon which is available in the area you are in;

  • Homebirth.
  • Birthing Unit that your caregiver uses.
  • Primary or Birthing Unit that is staffed by Midwives and your caregiver also uses.
  • Secondary Unit that has some extra services available.
  • Tertiary Unit that has all services available.

Depending upon you and your babies health requirements, there may also need to be other caregivers involved in your care. This will be arranged by your caregiver if needed.

 

WHAT WILL MY CARE COST ME?

Midwifery care is free to all women who are;

  • citizens born in New Zealand and also permanent residents. 
  • Work permit for 2 or more years, or that totals more than 2 years (not a work visa).
  • Married to a NZ citizen or permanent resident.
  • Defacto of a NZ citizen, permanent resident, or work permit holder of 2 or more years (not a work visa).
  • Australian citizen or permanent resident, who has or will reside in NZ for 2 years.
  • UK/AUS Northern Ireland citizen or permanent residents are covered for immediately necessary treatment only.

Some proof of documentation may be required.

 

WHAT CAN I DO TO HAVE A HEALTHY PREGNANCY?

Now is a great time to look at healthier eating by reducing sugar and having more vegetables and fruit, increasing water intake, stopping smoking and drinking. Quitline have some very good programmes to help stop smoking.  The ministry of health pamphlet on healthy eating in pregnancy has guidelines for quantities and safe food recommendations. Folic acid and iodine can be prescribed by your Dr or Midwife.

eating-safely-and-well-during-pregnancy

 

HOW WILL I KNOW I’M IN LABOUR?

Most people know when they are in labour but a few are unsure.   Some early labour signals can be a pink show of blood or mucous and mild low cramping.  Some people will have the bag of waters (liquor) around the baby break early and some not at all.

Labour is usually a gradual process but 3 key things can happen.  Contractions that are getting longer, stronger and/or closer need to be mentioned to your caregiver.

WHEN SHOULD I CALL MY CAREGIVER?

A caregiver should be contactable 24 hours 7 days a week. Obviously nobody can possibly be available every second they may be needed.  However any time you are worried you should be able to contact them or their backup, but be mindful of their rest, as you want someone who is refreshed taking care of you. Ask them when and how they would like you to call for routine enquiries or in labour.

Here are some warning signs that you should call about;

  • Any bleeding
  • Shortness of breath
  • Redness, swelling or sore leg
  • Less baby movements
  • Wet underwear
  • Unexplained swelling
  • Persistent headache or vision problems
  • Pain that is not fleeting and does not go away

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I THINK MYSELF OR MY PARTNER IS NOT COPING?

Depression can be during pregnancy or postnatally.  It is important that you seek help from your G.P or support services early if you feel things are not right. Counseling or medication are available for this very common problem.  Support services can work with you to help, especially if you do not have family that can be there for you.

WHAT SHOULD I PACK FOR HOSPITAL?

There are a lot of items that you could pack for hospital and only you will know which ones you want. Some ideas are;

  • Your birth plan
  • Choice of pain relief – Tens machine, Aromatherapy, Homeopathy, Acupressure/Acupuncture, Hypnotherapy
  • Clothes for labouring (perhaps in water) and afterwards. Non slip socks and slippers. Large underwear and maternity pads
  • Breastfeeding bras, nipple cream and disposable breastpads, (cloth are best kept for home where they can be washed)
  • A few clothes for baby, wipes and nappies
  • Washing bag to take home wet and dirty washing
  • Something to read or do.  Personal items that relax you
  • Lollipops to suck for energy
  • Water bottle
  • Easily eaten food and drink for you and your birth support
  • Toiletries, massager and oil, lip balm, hair tie, heat pack (not a hot water bottle)
  • Camera/video or phone and a long cord charger
  • Contacts names and numbers to call
  • Notebook and pen
  • Coins/notes for machines and parking
  • Glasses or contacts and any prescribed medication
  • Ask the hospital if you need to have your own formula and bottles if you are not breastfeeding

Make arrangements for children and pets.  Have a plan for who will be sober, calm, safe to drive, and how you will get to hospital.

BABYS HOSPITAL BAG

  • 2 hats.
  • 2-3 singlets.
  • 3 outfits, choose onesies/stretch and grow/nighties.
  • Disposable nappies are best for the first few days until the meconium (black poo) is gone
  • Nappy cream to help stop the meconium sticking
  • 2 socks or booties.  (check for any loose threads that could wrap around toes)
  • Mittens are a personal choice
  • 2 cardigans
  • 2 wraps/swaddle/blankets

All items should be wool or cotton, not acrylic. Size 000 usually fits a 3-4kg baby.  Some labels may need to be removed so they won’t irritate the skin.

BASIC BABY CLOTHES AND EQUIPMENT

The following is a basic list of some items you may want to get ready4baby

  • 25-35 cloth nappies or enough disposable nappies for approximately 25 a day
  • Nappy pins if using cloth
  • 3-4 over naps
  • 3-4 nighties or onesies/stretch and grows
  • 3 woollen and 3 cotton singlets
  • 6 pairs woollen booties/socks
  • 2 woollen hats
  • 1 sunhat
  • Facewipes
  • Soft towel
  • Nappy bucket with a safety lid or rubbish bin
  • Nappy wash
  • Car seat
  • Push chair/pram/buggy
  • Bassinet and/or cot with a new firm mattress (no pillows or cot bumper pads!)
  • Blankets (not polarfleece) and sheets
  • Baby bath or large bowl (optional).  Some people use the sink or shower
  • 3 large wraps, muslin or cotton (not polarfleece)